Pat Fiorello - Art Elevates Life

Art & Inspiration from professional artist and instructor Pat Fiorello. Pat is known for her romantic landscape, garden and floral paintings in oil and watercolor. Her paintings often depict beautiful places like Italy and France. Pat teaches painting workshops in the U.S., Caribbean and Europe. She is passionate about inspiring others to include art in their life. Whether creating it or simply appreciating and enjoying it, there are so many ways that art elevates life!

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Bursting with Love

"Bursting with Love"
16 x 20 Oil Painting
by Pat Fiorello
SOLD
The latest of my "Forever  Bouquet Paintings" going to a beautiful bride, Caity, in Florida.

This romantic garden style bouquet was created by floral designer Sue Bain of Signature Florals in Fort Myers Florida. She did an absolutely breathtaking job with the selection and variety of flowers and textures. You can learn more about Sue's services at: http://www.signature-florals.com/.

To see more of my bridal bouquet paintings, visit http://patfiorello.com/wedding_bouquet

Contact me if you'd like to commission a painting as a gift for someone you love.

Monday, April 3, 2017

Synergy

Synergy
12 x 12 Oil Painting
by Pat Fiorello



When painting flowers  in oil, I typically follow one of two general methods. One I will call an impressionist approach ( I was first introduced to it by Hedi Moran and later learned a similar method while studying with Ovanes Berberian).   The other, is what I will call a traditional approach, which I learned studying with Dennis Perrin.

Both approaches are effective and enjoyable.  I've done studies in the past on the same subject painting it with one method and then painting a 2nd version the other way to see how different the results actually are. 

Over the years, I've actually done the same painting using several different methods a few times,  each time expecting to see a vast difference in the outcome. Frankly,  while the process is different, there really isn't that much of a difference in the final outcome on the canvas.  Maybe part of that is you are the same artist, with the same brushstrokes, color tendencies etc.. So I've pretty much concluded,  you have to have a strong composition, clean colors, careful planning of and attention to values and a variety of edges plus what I'll call the X factor ( which is your own passion, excitement for the subject and personal vision/ intention for the painting- why you decided to paint it) to have a strong result.  All methods eventually address each of these areas,  some just emphasize a particular aspect or sequence things differently. So at the end of the day, you get to a pretty similar place, you might just have taken a different route.

What I did for this particular experiment was explore what would happen if I  combine the 2 methods. In other words, bring together the best aspects of each of my 2 favorite methods. The impressionist approach stresses color first with bold, transparent loose underpaintings and the traditional approach emphasizes simple abstract value shapes allowing for refinement of color later in the process.

Below are some steps along the way in attempting to combine elements of both approaches into my own approach. It may have added another step to the overall process, but I was pleased with the outcome and felt it gave me the best of both worlds to combine the 2 approaches.

I think if I would have tried this as I was initially learning either method it might have been overwhelming to combine different methods, but since I've been painting with both approaches for awhile, it took some concentration, but was manageable. 

So if you are new to painting, you may want to stick with one approach to build that muscle and confidence and then build on that by experimenting with other methods. No matter what be patient. Some of these experiments work, some don't and you end up scraping off a lot of paint and starting all over again. But the more your experiment, the more you will learn and the more tools and confidence you will have in tackling any painting subject you desire.
Who knows what you may discover?

Happy Painting!


                             








Thursday, March 30, 2017

Rose Study #3

Rose Study #3
6 x 8 Oi Painting
by Pat Fiorello
$100

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Rose Study # 3-  with each study in this series, I'm trying to do something a little different to explore some different directions and possibilities. Took a little different approach with the background on this one compared to studies 1 & 2.

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Rose Study #2

Rose Study #2
6 x 6 Oil Painting
by Pat Fiorello
Second in current series of small individual rose studies.

Monday, March 27, 2017

Rose Study #1


Rose Study #1
6 x 8 Oil Painting
by Pat Fiorello
Continuing my studies of roses, here's the latest...
With some preliminary steps along the way





Sunday, March 26, 2017

Holiday Floral

Holiday Floral
10 x 14 oil painting
by Pat Fiorello
$425
It may be getting close to Easter, so it feels a little strange to be painting a Christmas type subject, but I was asked to submit some artwork for a floral-themed card for the 2017 holiday card line of American Artist Group, a greeting card company who has published several of my paintings as cards over the years. I didn't have access to holiday flowers at this time of the year, but made this idea up from a combination of imagination, silk flowers and my own photo's from past holidays.

Click here to see my boxed floral card collection published by AAG.

Saturday, March 25, 2017

White Rose Study




White Rose Study
6 x 8 Oil Painting
By Pat Fiorello



Did a study of a single white rose as a demonstration in a workshop the other day and that has started me onto a series of studies, experimenting with different approaches, methods, colors etc..


Here were a few steps along the way, using the transparent underpainting method- one of the methods I often use for flowers to get an impressionistic feel.



















Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Soft and Lovely

Soft & Lovely
9 x 12 Oil Painting
by Pat Fiorello

During last week's workshop I did a quick demo showing how to paint a glass vase. Decided the vase must have some flowers so added the roses later.

Monday, March 13, 2017

Petal Pushers- Painting Hydrangeas in Oil Demonstration

Petal Pushers
12 x 16 Oil Painting
by Pat Fiorello
$650

"Petal Pushers" is a painting I created as a "paint along" demonstration in the "Painting Flowers Alla Prima " Workshop I recently taught.   In that workshop, I introduced students to one of several methods I use in oil painting- but I find this approach, which I first learned from Hedi Moran,  is particularly fun and freeing for flowers. I start with a loose transparent underpainting of the subject and then the background till the whole canvas is covered.

At this point the painting is way too garish- but you have to go thru this phase underneath and you'll calm it down with the next round. I told the students it's like going thru the teenage stage- loud and ugly, but you have to get thru it to get to the other side and create something beautiful and colorful.

 Then come in with an second layer of paint on top of that where opaque colors can be used in addition to the tranparents.  You can continue to resolve the painting as loosely or tightly as you desire. Below are some of the steps along the way.    On the first day of the workshop I break down the process step by step and students follow along on the same painting.  On days 2 & 3,  once they understand the process, they bring in their own flowers to arrange and paint.

Upcoming workshops are listed on my website at: http://patfiorello.com/

If you are associated with an arts organization and would like me to come teach in your area, please contact me to explore the possibilities. Thanks!







close up of brush work and colors

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Spring Study

Spring Study
8 x 8 Oil Painting
by Pat Fiorello

 
A small study done earlier this week in preparation for a larger painting. Daffodils and Hyacinth were freshly cut from my own garden. My studio was filled with the scent of the hyacinths! Looking forward to the joy of Spring!

Monday, March 6, 2017

Spring Joy!

Spring Joy!
9 x 12 Oil Painting
by Pat Fiorello
$425

 I decided to make a larger painting with a collection of spring flowers that are now blooming in my garden- daffodils, hyacinth, lenten rose and jasmine.  These spring colors are natural complements- yellow and purples.

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Garden Spot II

Garden Spot II
8 x 10 oil painting
 $300


My friend's husband had taken a lovely photo of a sunlit bench in Italy and he generously gave me permission to use it as inspiration for a painting. I did not want to copy it exactly, so used another bench and adjusted the flowers with an aim towards an impressionistic painting conveying the feeling of the sunlit flowers over the bench. I initially painted Garden Spot I but then decided to have the bench more on an angle so did a second version, Garden Spot II, which I think is a little more dynamic and better fulfilled on my original intention.

Garden Spot I

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Villa Garden II

Villa Garden II
12 x 16 oil painting
by Pat Fiorello
Revisited version II of my exploration from last week and made a few edits.

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Peonies of Giverny

Peonies of Giverny
16 x 20 Oil Painting
by Pat Fiorello
$1500

I came across a photo I took in 2015 while teaching in Giverny at Monet's Gardens. It was already a pretty nice arrangement of peonies right as they were on the bush. I simplified it a bit and spread out the cluster a little and painted from there.

Here are a few steps along the way...







And the original reference photo...


Thursday, February 9, 2017

Villa Garden I and some background on the process.

Villa Garden I
12 x 16 Oil Painting
by Pat Fiorello
Did a little experiment with this painting.  I most frequently paint using one of 2 different methods.  I wanted to do the same scene with both methods to compare if there was any difference in the results or the experience of the process along the way.

One option, is an approach I learned from Dennis Perrin and in it's most basic form is a pretty traditional "alla prima' approach of drawing on a toned canvas and then working dark shapes to light shapes first in a very general sense and then  coming back a second time refining color temperature, edges,texture etc..  I used that "traditional' approach for Villa Garden I which I did first.

Then today I did another version using quite a different approach which I first learned from Hedi Moran. It's more of a looser impressionist approach which starts with no drawing, just a general lay in of shapes by color using only transparent colors. then you come back in and create form and get more specific with both opaques and transparents. I used that "impressionistic"  approach for version II of Villa Garden posted below.

I've also included my original reference photo from Lake Maggiore in Italy. I believe it was taken on Isola Madre. It's a beautiful scene but quite busy with a lot of detail.  I also have a value sketch which helped me simplify this complicated scene into some larger simple shapes of light, medium and dark values. I stress in all the classes I teach- whether watercolor or oil- that it is important to do these small sketches before starting a painting. The few minutes of planning ahead, saves a lot of confusion later on during the process. With major value decisions and composition determined up front, you can be freer to just enjoy the painting process, have fun with color, brushwork etc.. without getting lost in muddled values.  I'd rather have a map or GPS than be lost on the road hoping to find my final destination. consider the value sketch your Painting GPS.

Below I also posted photo's from the initial start of what I'm calling the traditional method vs the impressionistic method.You can see the start is quite different. By the end though, I don't think the result was that  much different. The drawings are slightly different and the colors I chose today using artistic license were a little different. ( I didn't look at the first one while doing the second and my intent was not to exactly reproduce the photo, just use it as a jumping off point for my own interpretation).  But fundamentally, I don't think the paintings are dramatically different. And seeing them side by side, I could make revisions in either one to move one way or another.

The impressionist approach feels a little easier and more carefree to me, but it's probably because I have been doing it much longer and it feels freeing to start a painting with no drawing and just block in big shapes.

I'm still reflecting on lessons learned here.  At the end of the day, you still need a good composition with a strong value pattern, clean and harmonious colors, deliberate brushwork, attention to edges and all the other fundamentals. So whether you take the trip values first or color first, you'll eventually have to get all the bases covered.

The nice think is- there is no one right way- there are many possible approaches to get you to your desired intention and keep you from getting in a rut of the same approach every time.

Villa Garden II
12 x 16 Oil Painting

Reference Photo
Value Sketch


Start for approach I
Start for approach II